DEFENDING TERRITORY

Many bird species are highly territorial while breeding. Breeding success depends on the quality of territory that the male holds. Females tend to choose males that are in possession of better territories containing large sources of food. This ensures successful survival of the offspring. Males jealously defend territories and once pairing takes place, pairs of many species of birds defend territories together. Competitive males and pairs try to intrude into the territories that are better than theirs and try to take these over, resulting in territorial disputes.

On 10th February 2014, in the riverbed of Kosi, overlooking NAMAH, a pair of River Lapwing Vanellus duvaucelii found their territory being intruded by another pair. The accompanying images show how the dominant pair managed to push the intruders out of their territory.





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"A pair of River Lapwings find another pair intruding in their territory."
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"Both pairs encounter each other. They raise themselves vertically to show aggression and call continuously. This continues for 2-3 minutes."
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"One of the pairs show submission by lowering their bodies."
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"The dominant pair immediately attacks the other pair."
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"The submissive pair creates distance with the dominant pair."
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"The submissive pair crosses the small stream and leaves the territory of the dominant pair."
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"The dominant pair watches the intruders leave clear of their territory."